Status: Working from home

“What you stay focused on will grow.”
Roy T. Bennett

As of Monday 16th March 2020 I have been a remote worker.

Ever since I left University I have worked in busy, bustling offices where the air runs thick with collaboration, questions and social commentary.

But now… I’m at home. I guess you could say I’m not quite sure how to come to terms with this. It certainly is strange knowing that my commute in the morning has gone from 50 minutes on the bus to 50 seconds from bedroom to dining room (via the kitchen for coffee). It’s even stranger though that I don’t get to see colleagues; friends, who I’ve worked with for years and who’s smiling faces, cheerful demeanor and indomitable spirits have been huge contributing factors to my desire to tackle the working day and make as much of it as i possibly can.

In the past remote working was simply the odd days I worked here and there from home, with nothing but my laptop because it was a quieter day when I could do some learning as well as some other life task like going to the doctor or dropping the car off to be serviced – therein lies the problem.

I had come to associate working from home with quieter periods of time, when I could focus on 1 thing at a time, maybe work from the sofa and treat myself to the occasional snack.

As of Monday however, the entire office has been locked down and we are _all_ working from home… for how long? I don’t think anybody knows. The only certainty in the world right now is that nothing is certain – so it is time to put into practice something that I always preach, but rarely am pushed to exercise. I will have to change my mindset.

I’m not alone in this at all – you may be reading this thinking “but Chris, working from home is so easy, I actually get more done and I’m more focused!” and if that is the case I applaud you, and I wish I could share those same abilities. However if you’re like me and suddenly working from home by directive has jarred you, here are my top 3 tips for working from home that have helped me get to grips with it and maintain my productivity:

1- Find a routine

This is perhaps the most important on my personal list because in the past I have found myself getting out of bed at 7.30/8am on days where I worked from home. This is ~2 hours after I would normally get up when commuting into the office and whilst this sort of lay in is great at the weekend to get some rest, it also leads to me being groggy and not fully awake when your start your morning meetings/calls/work and doesn’t help you focus or build a reasonable mental list of priorities.

Take aspects of your normal daily routine and replace them so that you build up a Monday-Friday (for example) that represents something similar to the structure you enjoyed when working from the office. Here is an example of how I have changed my schedule to adapt to my new working situation; I would normally catch the bus to the office which would take anywhere between 40 and 50 minutes first thing in the morning. Now at exactly the same time in the morning I go for a 30-40 minute brisk walk to simulate that commute – match something you did to something creative, compelling, healthy or otherwise you can do from home instead.

The thing to bear in mind is that finishing work for the day should also factor into your plan. It is very very easy when one works from home, to simply leave the laptop open or code running or join a late call. These things will rapidly eat into your personal life though so once you hit your magic “clocking off” time… clock off.

2 – Create separation between work and home

Even though they are now one and the same, you have to keep a separation between your work and home lives. I’ve heard it described by many people that they have set up in the study or in the office – but what do you do when you live in a small flat? Or if you live with your parents who are _also_ working from home and you have to say, work in your bedroom?

My solution to this, as I have a similar problem, is to make certain touches to transform myself and the space i’m working in to make it feel as though there is a transition between going from home to work.

Once I have come back from my walk I relax and make a coffee and some toast or cereal whilst watching YouTube videos, then at 7.55am precisely, my Amazon Echo buzzes an alarm, I turn the television off and I begin “building” my work space. A process which involves taking out the monitor and accompanying cables, setting them up on the dining room table, neatly arranging where everything should go and plugging in my phone and finally ensuring that I have a full bottle of water on standby to stay hydrated.

Conversely at the end of the day I will go through the same ritual in reverse to the point where we are all able to sit around the dining room table and have dinner with no trace that I was ever there working. This act of transformation somehow makes the space seem different, and gives it a different energy, which means i’m not thinking about work problems whilst I eat with my family.

3 – Communicate, Communicate, Communicate

Ok. This one is a no-brainer, but there are subtle levels to communication that can really help when you’re feeling the weight of working from home hovering above you like so much foreboding.

Whenever you’re feeling the pinch of distraction or you’re lacking motivation, message a colleague you would normally speak to on a daily basis at the office and ask them how they are. It seems simple but if you rotate who this person is and just check in on them you make them feel though about, cared about and appreciated. Not only does this give them the motivation to carry on but is a selfless act that can also revamp your own spirits and the resulting conversation can even inspire the thoughts you need to help with whatever you’re working on.

There are so many posts about working from home and engaging with others on a technical and personal level, such as Kendra’s post on SSC, Kathi’s post on SimpleTalk or this incredibly detailed and insightful post from Alice Goldfuss, that many of these will be repeats on what others have said. However, I think my personal top 3 on communication specifically are:

  1. Turn your webcam on – be seen and see other people and enjoy the smiles and the thinking and the body language you would otherwise be missing out on.
  2. React and be reacted to -if you use Teams or Slack or any kind of collaboration tool, make sure that when people make statements or ask questions, you either offer feedback or at least react. A thumbs up emoji at least lets people know that you are listening, allowing them to feel validated and supported and not think they’re just shouting into the void.
  3. Learn to use a mute button – we have all been in situations where someone has mouth breathed the meeting to postponement or someone has had a coughing fit or their child(ren) have come in asking questions – all of these are perfectly fine because we’re humans… but. That is no excuse for everyone in the meeting internal or external to hear that. Liberally use your mute button on your meeting software or headset and make sure you are able to contribute meaningfully, but that when you’re not contributing, you’re also not hindering others from doing so.

Conclusion

Right now is a difficult time. Very much so – and I hope you’re all doing well and staying healthy and happy. Working from home makes up a small portion of what everyone is feeling and struggling against at this point in time and so we should remember to be mindful and grateful that we even are a part of companies who are able to support us working from home as the ability to even do so is a blessing.

Remember to take your mindset and find a way to turn each of the things you struggle with into positives; recognize them, appreciate them and ask yourself why you’re feeling that way, and then find a way to deal with it that makes you more productive and/or happier – most companies have a wealth of people who are experienced in or who are dedicated to help you working from home, don’t be afraid to ask for help if you need it and see if someone can help you tackle some of the problems you’re facing. Everyone is different and will need different things, just because you don’t feel comfortable working from home, for any reason, doesn’t mean you’re doing things wrong. We’re all learning together.

So stay safe, stay healthy and stay awesome and I’ll leave you with my favorite tweet so far on the matter:

P.S. We also just recorded a DBAle Special Episode on working from home, where all podcast participants were working from their respective homes, if you’re interested, you’ll be able to listen on Spotify, Apple Music and directly here: https://www.red-gate.com/hub/events/entrypage/dbale when it goes live in the next few days 🙂

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