Using things weirdly – Part 2: Static Data in the Hybrid Model (w/ Redgate SQL Source Control and Change Automation)

“Where’s your will to be weird?”
Jim Morrison

I had some really positive feedback on my last “Using things weirdly” post, and truth be told, I love to use things weirdly. The number of times I’ve heard: “Oh, well, sure yeah I guess it works that way too…” is just too many to count. So imagine how my eyes lit up when I realized that you can do something weird with one of my favorite things to talk about at the moment, The Hybrid Model.

Now if you don’t know about the Hybrid Model then I would suggest you check out my post here that’s all about the different source control models available for your databases!

The Problem

Across both the State based and Migrations based offerings within the SQL Toolbelt, you have access to something very cool: the ability to easily (alongside the schema) source control your static data. Now don’t ‘@’ me because you think I should be referring to it as “Semi-Static” because it might change occasionally and ‘that’s not truly static then is it?‘; I could easily also refer to it as ‘Lookup Data’ or ‘Reference Data’, basically whatever you class things like “Country Codes” and “Currency Codes” as.

Whatever you call it, it can go into your VCS like any part of the database schema:

SQL Source Control: State Based
SQL Change Automation: Migrations Based

But. One thing that – as of writing this RIGHT NOW (23/07/2020 10:09am BST) – is not officially available in the Hybrid Model combining these two methods… is Static Data. The Data tab in SQL Change Automation even disappears when you set it up as a Hybrid workflow:

And this gives me a sad.

sad monty python and the holy grail GIF

The Solution?

Got your Hybrid Model setup and ready to go? Let’s use it weirdly!

1 – Use SQL Source Control to commit some static data to your state repository. This is as easy as right clicking on your (highlighted green) source control linked database and selecting “Other SQL Source Control Tasks” > “Link/Unlink Static Data“, and picking your tables.

Nothing should be showing in SQL Change Automation:

2 – Unlink SQL Change Automation from the state repository for a moment and link it instead directly to the development database. This will cause it to go into Migrations-First mode. You can do this by clicking the blue source name in SSMS and picking Existing Database instead:

Because it’s technically the same database as you’re source controlling in the state repository, it should all just work™ and should tell you there are no dev changes to the source. Then you’ll see the “Data” tab has been enabled:

3 – Select the same tables to source control as you did with SQL Source Control by using the Add Tables wizard:

BUT WAIT!!

shocked oh my god GIF

Isn’t it now going to generate a migration for our static data?? This isn’t included in the baseline or anything at all so far, so is it going to try and insert all of my static data into tables later on that already have it?

No. Actually we’re fine!

4 – Generate the static data migration script (and look at it for peace of mind). Notice that the script actually has checks in there – because we’re newly adding these tables, the migration will check if the tables are empty before trying to run the script, and only AFTER this migration will SQL Change Automation start generating the differential, incremental static data migrations:

Commit this migration script to your migrations repository, and that’s all we need to do here!

5 – All that’s left now, is to re-hook-up the Hybrid pipeline, follow the same steps you did before in Step 2 but this time, instead of an existing database, just link it back to the state repository like it was before. If you’ve done this right, you should see no changes pending for migrations:

BUT you will notice that if you change any static data with SQL Source Control, it should now show up in SQL Change Automation!

Change to static data prior to commit in SQL Source Control
Change before migration script generation in SQL Change Automation
Generated migration script to be committed

Conclusion

Is it an intended use? No absolutely not, the reason it’s disabled is that with all things at Redgate they are considered heavily to ensure users are offered the best possible user experience, functionality and essentially something that meets requirements across the board.

But. We can use it weirdly to, as i say, just make it work™.

What have you used weirdly lately? Let me know!

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