DBAle hits 5000 listens

We see our customers as invited guests to a party, and we are the hosts. It’s our job every day to make every important aspect of the customer experience a little bit better.”
Jeff Bezos

The date is June 6th 2018. Our producer Louise has just setup a slack channel called #dbale with the topic: “Hi, thought i’d just set this up as it might be the easiest way to chat about the podcast idea at this early stage.” purely off the back of a conversation we had after a practice run for this webinar where I suggested to Chris and Lou that I loved working with the 2 of them, and that we should do some kind of podcast together.

We produced our first DBAle episode and it went live around the 12th July 2018, the production quality was very low, like abysmal and we didn’t really know what we were doing, but it was up. It had it’s own landing page, we were on Spotify and Google Play Music. It was “a thing”.

Little did we know though, it started something. I will never try to quantify that something because it was a weird something, something that could only be produced by 2 Chris’ getting in front of a microphone, drinking a beer and talking about data.

There are a hundred different podcasts out there that are super good if you’re looking to learn more about data like SQL Data Partners or Dear SQL DBA and we wanted to be a bit different. So fortunately people are able to join us on our own journey of discovery and also have a laugh on the way!

Fortunately, as a podcast backed by Redgate we get the added benefit of having access to some superstars as well, like episode 17 with the incredible Steve Jones, or the live episode with the incredible Chris Yates. I have to admit I’m very excited for the next few episodes for this very reason! Look out for February’s episode as it’s sure to be wonderful, and hopefully we’ll even persuade none other than Kendra Little herself to join us soon! (Hint, Kendra, hint!!)

I guess this blog post wasn’t to give insight into how to sustain a podcast, keep motivated or even what the formula for success is, as I’m not sure we know any of these (at least 1 point would be invest in a good microphone, we found that out the hard way). But there is one thing I do know, we keep doing what we love and at time of writing we are at 5,300 unique downloads, so I wanted to take the opportunity to say thank you.

Thank you to everyone who has supported us, thank you to everyone who has been on or helped produce the show, and a massive thank you to everyone who has listened.

Here’s to the next 5000 listens, a year of fun, beer and friendship… oh and data. Here’s a picture of the crate of beer and scratch off bucket list Redgate (thanks Louise!) got us for hitting the 5,000 mark:

P.S. Everyone asks me what my favorite episode of DBAle was so far, so if you’re interested then check out these two (as I couldn’t pick!)

Servers that go bump in the night(time): https://www.red-gate.com/hub/events/online-events/dbale-05-servers-go-bump-nighttime

Monitor the state of the 8%: https://www.red-gate.com/hub/events/online-events/dbale-09-monitor-the-state-of-the-8

Using things weirdly – Part 1: The SQL Clone Config Database

“If the challenge exists, so must the solution.”
Rona Mlnarik

I like to use things in the way they weren’t intended. It leads to behaviors you weren’t expecting… and that’s pretty fun.

Often though, when you work for a software company, people want your solutions to do things they just were not designed to do, or have no capabilities to do at that exact point in time. The answer then that will often come back to you is a resounding: “I’m sorry, that’s not available at this time.” of course that is if you’re lucky enough to get an answer at all.

It’s no secret though, none of us who answer those questions like saying that. There is nothing worse than not being able to help people with what they’re trying to do.

Now don’t get me wrong – some people’s questions should be challenged. You cannot immediately assume that the person you’re talking to has all of the available variables, or has thought of any alternative means of achieving their end goal – which is why it is always important to ask ‘the why behind the why’. Every question has at least one immediate answer:

“I am going to buy a car.”
“Why?”
“Because I want to drive to work.”

This seems like a perfectly reasonable response. But what if we haven’t thought about every available option here? I can take this at face value and sell you a car, but i haven’t asked where you live and work; perhaps you live within the congestion zone in London where driving is impractical. Do you actually have off-street parking available? Will you need the car for other trips or just for work? With a little additional questioning and thinking we might establish that you live right near a London Underground station and it would be more cost effective and slightly faster to instead commute by Tube.

This is not just a sales tactic, rather one that should be used to better understand ever requirement, personal or professional – there is no substitute for good understanding.

But there are times when a perfectly reasonable request is made with good justification and unfortunately you’re still unable to help. But sometimes there are still ways to help, even if it doesn’t natively fall within the remit of the solution you’re working with. I had one such question recently:

“I would like to receive a list of Clones per image that have been created, which are older than 2 weeks and who created them, so I know which developers to nudge to refresh their Cloned environments and so we can create new images.”

Again this is a perfectly reasonable request, and the obvious answer was, well, “check the dashboard”, there’s a full list there with all of that information. When you have a good many developers all using SQL Clone though, it can get a little difficult to scroll through everything and identify the culprits. SQL Clone has no native alerting or reporting (as of writing) so it was assumed that was the best we could do.

Like I said though, I like to use things as they weren’t intended. Tee-hee.

When you install SQL Clone it creates a back-end SQLClone_Config database on an instance of your choosing (normally where you’ve installed the solution) for recording operations carried out within the software. This database is structured really, really logically that anyone can understand it and leverage it to meet their requirements.

By thinking a little more about their requirement we realized that it would actually be possible to leverage the database by running a very small snippet of T-SQL which could show us:

  • The name of the Clone
  • Who created it
  • Which Image it belongs to
  • When it was created and,
  • How old it is

This was as straightforward as:

SELECT C.Name                                AS CloneName
     , C.CreatedBy                           AS CloneOwner
     , I.FriendlyName                        AS BelongsToImage
     , O.Timestamp                           AS CreatedOn
     , DATEDIFF(DAY, O.Timestamp, GETDATE()) AS AgeOfCloneInDays
FROM dbo.Clones              C
    LEFT JOIN dbo.Images     I
        ON I.Id = C.ParentImageId
    LEFT JOIN dbo.Operations O
        ON I.Id = O.ImageId
WHERE O.Type = 1
      AND O.Timestamp < DATEADD(DAY, -14, GETDATE())
      AND C.DeletedOn IS NULL;

This gave us exactly what we needed:

It was just that simple. But we didn’t want to leave it there! So we set up an email to be sent to the heads of each development team from a SQL Server Agent Job with the output of this query each Monday morning so they could raise it with the relevant members just after stand up. Now I had never done this before so of course who would come to my rescue but the wonderful, knowledgeable (and just all round awesome-sauce-person) Jes Schultz with this post from 2014!

And with that – we used something that isn’t exactly supposed to be used in this way, but got something valuable up and running for their teams. It’s a simple answer, but it was quick, and it worked.

What’s a quick win you’ve had recently?